A little R&R

Pokhara, Nepal (map)

After the incredible 16 days we spent in the Everest region, both Dustin and I agreed that we were ready for some rest and relaxation. Before we arrived to Nepal we had still been contemplating the idea of hiking the Annapurna Circuit trek we had heard so much about from other hikers we had met around the globe. In the end, we are so happy we decided on the EBC trek, but that didn’t stop us from wanting to at least see the Annapurna himalayan range for ourselves.

As we mentioned in the Everest blog posts, we had become good friends with a Swedish Doctor named Per, so after arriving in Kathmandu we all decided it would be fun to make the bus trip over to Pokhara. This city just happens to be well known as the starting off point for treks in the Annapurna region. We had heard the bus trip would be a doozy, but with the many bus rides we have under our belt we thought it would be a breeze. We were wrong! The distance between Kathmandu and Pokhara is a measly 120 miles, so that should take even on super slow roads around 3 hours, right? Um NO, the journey for us took almost 8 hours!! Along with the roads being filled with pot holes and the bus driver blaring Nepalese music throughout the trip, the road is just 2 lanes and when there is a back up it causes major delays.

Would I say the awful bus ride was worth it? YES! Once we arrived in Pokhara we were immediately at ease. Away from the busy streets of Kathmandu we spent our days enjoying the lovely Lake Phewa as well as seeing some of the tourist highlights around the area. We had fun times with Per as well as our friends from the hike, Robbie and Sara from New Zealand, who after being stuck in Lukla waiting on their flight made it to Pokhara a few days after us. The weather was a bit iffy, but thankfully before we headed back to Kathmandu we were able to see the beautiful Annapurna range from the roof of our hotel.

Scenes from the bus on the way out of Kathmandu to Pokhara
We arrive to a lovely afternoon on Lake Phewa
Pokhara greeting party
Pokhara greeting party
Posing with our pal Per
Posing with our pal Per
Happy Hour Sunset view
Happy Hour Sunset
View looking up to the World Peace Pagoda where we plan to hike to
Looking up to the World Peace Pagoda where we plan to hike to
View from breakfast spot, locals doing laundry the only way they know how
View from our breakfast spot, locals doing laundry the only way they know how
For just a few dollars we headed across the lake to begin our hike up to the Shanti Stupa
For just a few dollars we headed across the lake to begin our hike up to the Pagoda
Our view halfway up the hike, the city of Pokhara in full view
Halfway up the hike, the city of Pokhara in full from afar
The World Peace Pagoda (Shanti Stupa)
The World Peace Pagoda (Shanti Stupa)

Peace Pagoda

Our rewarding view from the Peace Pagoda
Our rewarding view from the Peace Pagoda
View of Sarangkot from a distance
Sarangkot from a distance- can you see all the paragliders?
Shouting out for World Peace!
After our hike we headed to see Devi Falls, where the water plunges into a cave below
After our hike we headed to see Devi Falls, where the water plunges into a cave below
Across the way we headed down into Gupteshwor Mahadev Cave, that forms a cavern behind the thundering Devi Falls
Across the way we headed down into Gupteshwor Mahadev Cave, a cavern behind the thundering Devi Falls
After the cave we emerged to see the clouds had parted!
After cave exploring we emerged to see the clouds had parted!
Our Annapurna Sunset
Our Annapurna Sunset
View from our rooftop the day we left Pokhara
View of Macchapucchre (fish tail), Annapurna II and III from our rooftop the morning we left Pokhara
So long Pokhara!
In Kathmandu we visited one of the most significant Hindu temples in the world
Back in Kathmandu we visited Pashupatinath, one of the most significant Hindu temples in the world and a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Pashupatinath is celebrated for its human cremations that take place on the Ghats of the Bagmati River, which is considered sacred because it eventually flows into the Ganges River in India, ultimately reaching the holy city of Varanasi.
Pashupatinath is celebrated for its human cremations that take place on the Ghats of the Bagmati River, which is considered sacred because it eventually flows into the Ganges River in India, ultimately reaching the holy city of Varanasi.
Across from the Bagmati river are Fertility Temples where Hindu women come to pray for fertility. I may not be Hindu, but I Said a prayer for the future just in case 🙂

 

 

About EmilySue

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *